Maryland Section

Join us at a Science Cafe!

Please join the Chemical Society of Washington for a Science Café Event, a chance to discuss science and technology issues with experts set in the casual atmosphere of a DC restaurant!

Join Jeffery Seltzer, Acting Deputy Director of the Natural Resources Administration at the DC Department of Energy and Environment for an overview of the District’s water quality program and the critical role chemistry plays in establishing goals and tracking progress.

How Chemistry Directs the District’s Water Quality Program

Monday, April 22nd, 6:30 pm

Sudhouse DC

1340 U St NW Washington, DC 20009

This event is part of the Atlantic Regional Science Café Series (ARSCS), a collaboration between the Chemical Society of Washington, that Maryland ACS Section, and the North Carolina ACS Section. In preparation for the Fall 2019 National ACS Meeting exploring connections between chemistry and water, the participating ARSCS chapters will host science café events that their local members can attend in person while simultaneously livestreaming the discussion for members of other ACS sections to participate in through a webinar format.

Please register at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2522961769227252995 to let us know how you plan to attend the event (in person or by webinar) or contact cswsciencecafe@gmail.com with any questions.

This event is FREE and open to all ages and backgrounds!

The webinar link is https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2522961769227252995

 https://capitalchemist.org/2019/04/april-24th-science-cafe-how-chemistry-directs-the-districts-water-quality-program/
Please register at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2522961769227252995 to let us know how you plan to attend the event (in person or by webinar) or contact cswsciencecafe@gmail.com with any questions.

This event is FREE and open to all ages and backgrounds!

The webinar link is https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2522961769227252995

 https://capitalchemist.org/2019/04/april-24th-science-cafe-how-chemistry-directs-the-districts-water-quality-program/

Please register at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2522961769227252995 to let us know how you plan to attend the event (in person or by webinar) or contact cswsciencecafe@gmail.com with any questions.

This event is FREE and open to all ages and backgrounds!

The webinar link is https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2522961769227252995

https://capitalchemist.org/2019/04/april-24th-science-cafe-how-chemistry-directs-the-districts-water-quality-program/

This event is FREE and open to all ages and backgrounds!
The webinar link is https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2522961769227252995
 https://capitalchemist.org/2019/04/april-24th-science-cafe-how-chemistry-directs-the-districts-water-quality-program/

 

Maryland Section of the American Chemical Society

Welcome to the internet home of the Maryland Section of the American Chemical Society (MD ACS). One of 190 local sections, we are based in Baltimore, Maryland. We work to promote awareness and interest in a wide variety of chemistry subjects through monthly dinner meetings, community outreach, and working with students in chemistry and science.

2019 MD ACS STUDENT AWARD LUNCHEON

 

Dr. Dana Kollmann

Clinical Associate Professor, Towson University

"I Have an Idea!! Creative Thought and the Forensic Sciences"

When: Sunday April 14th, 2019, 11:30 am

Where: Doyle Formal Room, Notre Dame of Maryland University, Baltimore, MD 

Abstract: Just how old are the forensic sciences? We know the uniqueness of fingerprints has been appreciated for some time. Archaeologists have identified "maker's mark" impressions in 6,000-year-old Chinese pottery and thumbprint "signature" impressions in clay seals of ancient legal documents. In the year 1000, Roman attorney Quintilian used a bloody handprint to prove his client was being framed for murder. In 1248, the Chinese director of justice, jail and supervision reported the use of forensic entomology in eliciting a confession when fly larvae were deposited on the presumed murder weapon. In 1784, an Englishman was convicted of murder when document fracture matching was used to associate a piece of newspaper in the barrel of a pistol to a remnant recovered his pocket. In 1816, footwear and fabric impressions in mud were used to identify the killer of a young Englishwoman that was drowned and 1889, there commenced research on the uniqueness of land and groove impressions on projectiles. In 1987, DNA profiling was used for the first time in a United States Criminal court, and in 2004, the first DNA exoneration in the United States occurred right here, in Baltimore County, Maryland. Many of the advances in the forensic sciences started with a difficult case and one person who was not afraid to think outside the box.

 

Let's Celebrate!

                  

                   Video 

 

    

                   2019 ACS Fellows Program

                                      Nominations now open!

 

The American Chemical Society (ACS) Fellows Program was created by the ACS Board of Directors in December 2008 to recognize members of ACS for outstanding achievements in and contributions to science, the profession, and the Society.  
The nomination period closes on April 1, 2019.  The winners will be announced in late July.
For more information please go here: 
The American Chemical Society (ACS) Fellows Program was created by the ACS Board of Directors in December 2008 to recognize members of ACS for outstanding achievements in and contributions to science, the profession, and the Society. 
 
The Maryland section can nominate up to five nominees. Please send names of potential nominees and any pertinent information to the Chair of the section, Dr. Dana Ferraris (dferraris@mcdaniel.edu).
The nomination period closes on April 1, 2019.  The winners will be announced in late July.
For more information please go here: 

The American Chemical Society (ACS) Fellows Program was created by the ACS Board of Directors in December 2008 to recognize members of ACS for outstanding achievements in and contributions to science, the profession, and the Society.  
The nomination period closes on April 1, 2019.  The winners will be announced in late July.
For more information please go here: 
The nomination period closes on April 1, 2019.  The winners will be announced in late July.
 
 

                                                Plan to attend … MARM-2019                       

      

 

 NEWS:

Volunteer of the Year 2019  Dr. George Farrant Retired Chemistry Teacher  from Baltimore County Public Schools.              

ACS Celebrates Maryland Local section Volunteers

ACS Volunteer of the Year Award, 2019

     Dr. George Farrant, Student Awards Committee Chair. Retired Chemistry Teacher, BCPS

ACS Salutes to Excellence Award, 2018

     Dr. James A. Saunders, Nominations & Elections Committee Chair & Member at Large. Retired Chemistry Professor, Towson University

ACS Volunteer of the Year  Award, 2018

     Dr. Angela Sherman, Maryland Chemist of the Year Award Committee Chair & Treasurer. Notre Dame of Maryland University, Chemistry Dept. Chair